Non-computer enhanced role-plays usually degenerate into corrosive argument. \enhancing with simuation models overcomes this problem and ensures a financially attractive agreement.

Computer Enhanced Sales Negotiations

The situation where simulation models are used in a sales negotiation role-play

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Sales Negotiation Role-Plays are powerful tools but often suffer from the fact that they may deteriorate into ego contests as each side invents more and more constraints and assumptions. By giving the sellers and buyers separate planning models to assess the financial outcomes of their proposals and counter proposals a WIN-WIN solution is assured.

Stages in the Negotiation

  Sellers

Board Room (Negotiation)

Buyers

Preparation  
Information
Gathering
Meeting
 

 
Prepare
Initial
Proposal
 
Initial
Negotiation
 

 
Modify
Proposal
 
Final
Negotiation
 

 
       
Reach
WIN-WIN
Agreement
   

Example Simulations

All our computer enhanced negotiations work with each selling and buying team having their own PC and printer

Strengths

The administrative load is placed on the team and thus a trainer may manage several sets of buyers and sellers, But, as each negotiation must be observed by an impartial person it is necessary to have such a person for each group.

Participants expect to be using computers.

Weaknesses

A computer and printer is required for each team and this may not be possible in some locations.

Participants may be distracted by the computer. (There is a considerable body of research that suggests this. However, our designs take this into account and minimises this risk.)

Participants need to be computer literate and time can be wasted while they learn how to use the software. (With our simulations as we design them to be easy to use with comprehensive help systems)

Teams may become mesmerised by the simulation and so not spend enough time thinking and reflecting. (Our designs take this into account and force teams to do this).

As the teams must be in separate team rooms, it may be difficult for the trainer to manage this if there are a large number of teams of sellers and buyers.

Practicalities

The training group should be divided in to groups of buyers and sellers. Each buying and selling group should consist of four or five people. So, for example, a course of twenty people would be split in two.

Each half would consist of five sellers and five buyers. Each buying and selling team must have their own room and microcomputer and printer. (In the example above this would require four rooms and microcomputers.)

One of each pair of rooms should be large enough to handle both the buyers and the sellers when they meet to negotiate.

It is advisable to have a spare computer and printer.


2003  Jeremy J. S. B. Hall

Most recent update: 10/11/10
Hall Marketing, Studio 11, Colman's Wharf, 45 Morris Road, London E14 6PA, ENGLAND
Phone & Fax +44 (0)20 7537 2982 E-mail
jeremyhall@simulations.co.uk